American Islamic Media: Assorted and Aspiring
 

By GUSTAV NIEBUHR
New York Time

Then a visitor stopped by his office, Ahmed Osman pointed to a table laden with paperbacks that Amana Publications, a publisher of Islamic books, had been producing at its headquarters in Beltsville, Md., a Washington suburb, where Mr. Osman is director of publications.

"Muslim Teens: A Practical Islamic Parenting Guide" was one title. Others dealt with marriage, conversion and more. But the big seller was the Koran, in the English-language translation by Abdullah Yusuf Ali, Mr. Osman said.

Amana belongs to a widely scattered universe of American Muslim publishing, which links members of an ethnically diverse community through newspapers, magazines, books and Internet sites.

But Muslims in America are of course a very long way from the communication and publishing operations of evangelical Protestants, whose ventures have set the gold standard for media identified with a particular religious group. Such resources raise a group's public profile and ensure that its views will be heard, because prominent members can be easily identified by journalists and policy makers.

Naim Beig, secretary general

 
HOME | ABOUT US | SERVICES| ETHNIC MARKETS | CONTACT US |

Allied Media Corp.
6723 Whittier Ave.
Suite 204 
McLean, VA 22101
Contact@allied-media.com